Tips on How to Prepare and Deliver Your Flipchart Presentation

Flipchart easels can be low in price, very user friendly and an adaptable tool for presentations, meetings, classrooms or focus groups. A flipchart solution including a flipchart easel and pack of five flipchart pads can cost as little as £30 and can be easily set up in no time at all.

Yes it is a simple presenting tool, however this does not make it inferior to more modern methods and offers many benefits and tricks you can use for presenting. This article aims to offer tips to help you prepare and deliver your flipchart presentations.

Presenting Tips Using Flipchart Easels

1. Try to prepare your flipchart ahead of the presentation. Make sure you have completed most of your paper sheets in advance; therefor you can better engage and communicate with your audience instead of having your back turned to them. It is a good idea to leave certain components for either you or your audience to complete – this allows for audience participation.

2. The last page of your presentation should summarise all topics discussed throughout your presentation. This can be a simple list of bullet points that describes crucial areas you have covered and the message you want to convey.

3. Your start page should be clean, simple and deliver the overall subject with a title and your name. This will help communicate the overall message, clarity and not distract the audience from the start.

4. Ensure you keep a few pages blank so you can take notes, useful questions and record audience comments.

5. Similar to above, leave a little space for comments or notes and audience participation.

6. Prepare all your diagrams and pictures in advance in trace pencil so if you need draw them during the presentation, you can simply draw over them with your pen. This way you can precisely finish the diagrams in better time while simultaneously talking to your audience. It is crucial to check your flipchart easels for stability, so practice every instance beforehand.

7. Check your lettering is big and clear enough to be seen by people at the back of the group. It’s always a good idea to try this with some friends or colleagues before presenting. Ask your test audience to position themselves at the back of the room, create multiple sizes of text, until they agree a suitable size that is clearly legible.

8. Your words should be written in strong, dark colours such as blue or black as this is the easiest to read. Use colours to fill in charts, diagrams and pictures to make them more interesting.

9. Never block or stand in front of your flipchart easels during the presentation as it may frustrate the audience if you’re asking them to refer to the sheet for information.

10. To conclude the presentation, pass around one page handouts that cover the key points and message for the audience to take away. Try not to over complicate the content/design, or be tempted to include your whole presentation as it will simply end up in the bin.

How to Outline Your Business Presentation

The King in Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” had good advice that all of us should follow. He stated “Begin at the beginning and go on till you come to the end: then stop.”

This formula will work for any project that you are planning but particularly so for a business presentation. The key is to know what to begin with, what to include until you come to the end and when to stop. Following is an outline that will work well for any presentation.

1. Introduce yourself – Do not assume that anyone in the room will know you or your background. Be humble but, at the same time, make sure that you outline your credentials so that the people will know that you are qualified to speak on this topic.

2. Do some “housekeeping” – Provide information that will help the audience such as the break times, length of presentation, and location of the bathrooms. You might also have handouts which can be distributed at this point.

3. Find out who is in your audience – If there is a small group, you might choose to each person do a brief introduction that includes their name, occupation or department, and why they wanted to attend the presentation.

4. Describe the topic and why a presentation is being given about it – You can be brief as most people already know these facts but it is a good idea to remind them, from your perspective, as to why this is important.

5. Lay out the parameters – Name what will be covered and remember to identify the things that will not be covered during the presentation.

6. Define key terms – When you are speaking to a group, you need to begin by having them all start at the same level. This is done by eliminating assumptions and making sure that there is understanding of the basics.

7. Go into your teaching points – Every presentation is a learning opportunity for those who are attending. Make sure that you have created three to seven good, strong sub-headings that will help you to present the concepts and those in the audience to understand. By putting things together in groups, you will be most successful and the participants will be able to follow you easily. Divide the time that you have for all the concepts into equal parts and make sure that you stick to the timeframe.

8. Summarize – Once you have completed teaching the concepts within the presentation, you will need to briefly (in one or two sentences) review each. At this point, you might also want to review the strengths and weaknesses of each.

9. Provide resources for further study – Give websites, dates for further presentations or any other information that will assist the crowd with further learning.

10. Accept and answer questions – You may choose to either take questions during the presentation or at the end. Either is acceptable, as long as you have outlined your preference in the “Housekeeping” section. It is best to also tell how long you will be answering questions before you take the first one.

Preparing for presentations can be a demanding task but if you follow the ten steps outlined above, you will soon find that it will become easier and easier to do. And your audiences will be comfortable, knowing that you have mastered the process!

Use Mindmaps And This 4 Step Process To Eliminate Presentation Stress

Have you been to one of those presentations where you thought you just had to go away? The presenter was showing you dozens of slides. You could not identify any structure in it.

Your presenter probably did not use mindmaps to outline and present his or her information. Today, we have a look at how mindmaps will help you to get things clear for your next presentation. Even if you already created your presentation and you think it needs work (before the end of the day)!

Here are the 4 steps in using mindmaps for your presentation.

Step 1: Create an outline of your presentation

I assume you already have a general idea of what you will be speaking about. This is of course important.

This first step helps you in outlining your presentation. You can do that by creating a mindmap on either a large sheet of paper, a whiteboard or on your computer.

Put the topic in the middle of the mindmap. Then, you use free association to get ideas of what you want to discuss. Ask yourself questions like:

  • What is the purpose of the presentation?>/li>
  • What do I want my audience to learn or hear?
  • What is it they need to do after the presentation?
  • What does my audience know already?
  • Why was I asked to present my thoughts and information on this topic?

The main thing you should understand is that most of the time, you need to think from your audience their perspective. Sure, it’s great to talk about what you like. The only small thing is… you are not that important. You are there on a mission: entertain, educate, convince or inform your audience.

What you need to do is create branches in your map that give them answers to their questions. If you need additional guidance in this, make sure you ask the people who invited you or you can even ask some of the people who will attend the presentation. They can tell you what you need to talk about.

Once you have your first ideas on paper, you organize them. Put relevant information in the same branch. Organize your thoughts and create an outline. This outline is the basis of your presentation and could even be used as the basis of your hand-out.

The result of this first step is a one-sheet overview of your presentation.

Step 2: Write your presentation

With your outline as the blueprint of your presentation, you start to move into more detail. You write your thoughts on every topic directly in your mindmap.

That’s right, don’t take MS Word or another tool to write your entire presentation. You need to keep things organized. That is why you use the NOTES function of your mindmap tool to store your text.

You simply take a topic in the map and you write in there what you want to tell your audience. Be sure you start at the beginning of your outline. Write in one session your entire presentation. Don’t stop until you have about 80% to 90% of your presentation on paper.

Then… move away from your mindmap and do something completely different. Your subconscious brain will work on it for you.

After a few hours or even a day, you continue writing. You will be amazed about the additional content you can add to your text!

Usually, in about three writing sessions, you have 95% – 100% of your presentation covered in your mindmap.

Step 3: Rehearse and Minimize your map

This third step is important. You need to rehearse your presentation. Personally, I would rehearse the entire presentation for myself using a tape recorder. I simply read the content into a microphone. This way you will hear if sentences are too long or too complicated. When you find something strange, fix this immediately.

Your job is to make your presentation as clear as possible.

When you did this, you ask a colleague or friend to listen to your presentation. Use your text or mindmap to deliver the speech. Let them tell you what needs to be adjusted. You choose if your ‘audience’ does this during the presentation or afterwards.

When the content of the presentation is clear and ready to be used, you have to do one more thing. You need to minimize the mindmap. Copy the original mindmap into a new map and call it for instance presentation1_minimal. You need your ‘big’ mindmap later on.

Since you know what you are talking about, you can probably create a mindmap which shows you less words. Remember, each word or image in a mindmap is a key which unlocks information in your mind. Choosing the right words and images lets you access the information quickly. Think carefully about your map content.

The goal is to use sort of a minimalistic approach. Give your audience the right information and overview and show just enough to help you through your presentation.

When you reduced your map content, you only need to do one thing: print your maps, both the complete and the reduced content map. Also print your completely written out text. These are your backups. 

Step 4: Deliver your mindmapped presentation

Your big moment is here. You only feel a healthy amount of stress. This keeps you focused. You were asked to deliver this presentation AND you prepared, so you have absolutely nothing to worry about.

You may use a video projector or a flip-over or another presentation device to show your smaller mindmap. Remember that this is only to give the audience an overview of what you discuss and where you are in your presentation.

Remember I told you I don’t like text-only PowerPoint slides? This is why. You lose the overview. The mindmap you show won’t do that. It shows what was discussed, where you are right now and where you are going.

If for some reason, you can’t use a visual aid, you can always use the reduced-content-mindmap. Give this to your audience. I can almost guarantee you that they will have a second look at this later. During your presentation, they can add their notes to the mindmap as well.

Since you rehearsed your presentation a number of times, you can confidently deliver it.